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A New York printmaker unveils installation in Norman

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culpture contains works representing each religion's traditional prayer icons, such as Jesus and Buddha. The sixth space will frame the viewer and a mirror.

Projected onto fabric above the sculpture are digital images Buxton called "electric sheep," which emerge, disappear and reproduce. He said the dynamic fabric projections direct "energy" back to the canvases. The entire installation is laid out on dimensions that fit into a geometric pattern pulled from Judaic scripture, as imparted to humans by the Archangel Metatron.

"High concept" almost seems an understatement, but Buxton insisted that the complex installation won't overload the senses of viewers.

"I don't feel like we've crossed that threshold," he said. "It's definitely stimulating, but I don't feel it is approaching overstimulation. I think it is all digestible, but I'm also a big believer of pushing ideas as far as they can go. You make the greatest growth through failure. If you never go too far, never oversaturate, then you never know where that tolerance is."

Just tackling a theme as culturally engrained as distrust between religions makes a bold statement, but Buxton said the piece is not meant as a bully pulpit or a way to indoctrinate viewers, but rather art created to point out that positive energy inspired by faith is often directed at the same ideals of being good to oneself and others.

"The overall concept of the piece is not to tell people what to think, just to encourage people to think at all," Buxton said. "Encouraging people to reflect and to question how they've arrived where they are and what are the possibilities for the future."

Garrison Buxton, George Oswalt and Melanie Seward  displays through Dec. 5 at Mainsite Contemporary Art, 122 E. Main in Norman.

"?Charles Martin

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