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Of all the mega-franchises, Godzilla’s has been the most secure despite the myriad potholes it has faced.

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Of all the mega-franchises, Godzilla’s has been the most secure despite the myriad potholes it has faced. From its humble, message-movie beginnings in 1954 to its colossally low, corporate-sponsored nadir in 1998, it has endured countless trips to the big screen with somewhat varied results.

With a public hungry for giant spectacles projected in 3D on massive IMAX screens, it was a cinch that Godzilla was rife for a reboot. What wasn’t a cinch was that the task was given to Gareth Edwards, a director whose sole feature credit was 2010’s micro-budget Monsters.

What comes of this union, newly released on Blu-ray, is definitely a mixed bag. The filmmakers overestimate how much human element the public wants in any Godzilla movie outside of the original, piling on contrivances, an indefensible number of coincidences and a central character (Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Kick Ass 2) about whom we couldn’t care less.

But on the other hand, Godzilla remains an amazing achievement of spectacle and technology. If one’s sole purpose is to watch Godzilla mix it up with other giant creatures, there’s plenty to love here.

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