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Chicken-Fried News: Lights, camera, Oklahoma

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INGVARD ASHBY
  • Ingvard Ashby

The latest big-budget Hollywood feature to film in Oklahoma will tell the story of corruption and a systematic cover-up that usurps money and power from its rightful owners into the hands of a greedy minority.

No, we are not referring to the modern-day oil industry, but rather the film adaptation of Killers of the Flower Moon by author David Grann. The book tells the story of the Osage tribe that became the richest in the country in the early 20th century with the discovery of oil on their land near modern-day Pawhuska. The tribe’s leading families were infiltrated by white people and then serially murdered and ultimately lost their oil rights.

It was one of the first major cases for the FBI, but the book shockingly highlights how much deeper the conspiracy went than the people who were arrested by the feds. There’s a reason you never read about it in history books.

The spine-tingling true story has attracted some of Hollywood’s heavyweights, including Oscar winners Martin Scorsese, Leonardo DiCaprio and Robert De Niro. Scorsese removed all doubt that the production will take place in and around Osage County. In a meeting with Osage principle chief Geoffrey Standing Bear, Scorsese and his production said everything will be shot in Oklahoma, according to Tulsa World.

The film will take all measures to accurately depict Osage culture and language, according to Osage News, and principal filming will take place in spring and summer of 2020.

We’re happy to see that such a sinister story is being brought to light, especially by such an acclaimed production, considering most people can’t be bothered to read a book. De Niro is set to play Bill Hale, one of the main orchestrators of the Osage murders, who was 55 at the time he was convicted. It means 75-year-old De Niro won’t have to go through any fancy computer facial de-aging effects like in Scorsese’s upcoming film The Irishman because people in their mid 50s in the early 20th century were equivalent to 75-year-olds today; at least that’s how we think that works.

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