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Ally Moore said she didn’t do anything that special.

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From left, Alissa Williams steams milk in a coffee drink preparation while shop owner Ally Moore watches, at Compass Coffee Shop in Edmond.  mh
  • From left, Alissa Williams steams milk in a coffee drink preparation while shop owner Ally Moore watches, at Compass Coffee Shop in Edmond. mh

Ally Moore said she didn’t do anything that special.

She wanted her neighborhood to have a warm, local place to buy good coffee and treats. She also wanted her customers to feel welcome buzzing through on busy mornings or hanging out in a relaxed environment.

Did we mention it must have good local coffee?

“That’s really all there is to it,” she said. “We decided to go for it.”

(When she said “we,” she meant the two partners who prefer to remain behind the scenes.)

Compass Coffeehouse, 900 NW 150th St., is a new spot in Edmond near Quail Springs, almost in northwest Oklahoma City.

Before Compass, there was only one major chain coffee shop relatively close, and that one was still miles away.

“There just hadn’t been anything really close by, and we didn’t want to do anything super trendy or anything; we just wanted to be more of a local stop for the neighborhood,” Moore said.

And Compass offers coffee you won’t find at many metro locations. Topeca Coffee Roasters, 1229 E. Admiral Blvd., in Tulsa supplies Compass’ coffees. Its product, although mostly shade-grown in places like El Salvador, is supervised by the descendants of founder Rafael Álverez Lalinde, from bean to cup. Also, it roasts everything at its Tulsa headquarters. The family’s hands-on approach — and the fact that it’s local — convinced Moore to use Topeca.

“They’ve been in business since 1850. Everything they produce is fair trade if it’s not from a farm they own. But really, it’s that we just loved their customer service with us — we knew they were the right choice,” she said.

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Compass’ pastries are made by another veteran local producer, Brown’s Bakery, which has been in business since 1946.

The coffee house offers a daily selection of donuts, muffins, Danish pastries and gargantuan cinnamon rolls. For a more healthy start, try oatmeal or yogurt. Also find a selection of teas and warm, caramel-apple cider.

“I have a meeting today with another local producer for more on the menu,” she said. “You could say we like to keep things local.”

She’s being modest; her venue also is a member of Keep It Local OK, and cardholders get 10 percent off any espresso drink.

Even with her emphasis on locally made and handcrafted goodies and drinks, Moore also understands that many of her customers are short on time.

“We do have a drive-through,” she said. “We’re specialty coffee, and we do serve good coffee, but we know how to serve it on the go.”

As for seasonal specials, Moore finished out November with a pumpkin spice. At press time, she was putting finishing touches on other seasonal specialty drinks, including one called True North. As for any other hints about the flavors or ingredients, it’s a surprise. She said to visit her shop to find out.

Learn more at compasscoffeehouse.com or call 286-1440.

Print headline: The right direction, A new Edmond coffee shop is a quick but cozy alternative with a hyper-local approach.

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