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Local crooner Denver Duncan is hungry for respect

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NATHAN POPPE
  • Nathan Poppe

Oklahoma City’s own blue-eyed soul Denver Duncan has more in store for fans this fall and coming in 2015. After a yearlong hiatus following the arrival of his third child, the Rat Pack-inspired crooner is at it again, collaborating with numerous local artists on everything from national ad campaigns to his own personal “dream project” with longtime friend and OKC-based rapper Jabee Williams.

“There’s a lot in the can. We’re always talking about it and working on it, and it could possibly come out in 2015,” Duncan said. “My songwriting style and [Jabee’s] hip-hop really work well together.”

Williams isn’t the only local artist Duncan shares longtime dreams with. Since the 2011 release of the music video for “Stalker” — a catchy, funny tune about an overly enthusiastic fan — the singer-songwriter has been on the lookout for ways to work with Kyle Roberts, a friend and well-known videographer. Duncan and Roberts filmed the video on a Nokia N8 smartphone when Nokia selected “Stalker” to be the first official music video made on the phone. The whimsical video has since reached over 40,000 views.

“Kyle and I really want to build a rotating room someday for making music videos,” Duncan said.

The 32-year-old son of a preacher and music teacher — admittedly influenced by Frank Sinatra and having been compared to today’s Michael Bublé, Jason Mraz, Jamie Cullum and Robin Thicke — is certainly finding his place in the world of soulful pop. His 2010 debut release, Let’s See What Happens, won him widespread acclaim, including the number two spot on Oklahoma Radio’s Best Songs of 2010 list for haunting duet “Beg Me,” performed with Okie folkstress Sherree Chamberlain.

Fans eagerly awaiting more from Duncan, take heart: This October, he will begin to release a series of singles with music videos, including a special Christmas collaboration with country artist Bryan White. Duncan toured with White in December 2010, opening a series of Christmas shows for his longtime friend.

Duncan’s soulful sound is nosecret to the advertising world, either, as OKC’s Robot House Creative recently sought a Duncan original to soundtrack a national ad campaign for GlobalHealth. The ad will air in mid-September, and the track is simply titled “Good.” Expect nothing less from the impassioned songwriter, who is happy to once again share the stage with the talented Chamberlain.

“[We] take every chance we get to sing the song together,” Duncan said.

See Duncan perform live along with Sherree Chamberlain and Elms at the inaugural Heard on Hurd, Edmond’s ambitious food truck festival molded in the image of OKC’s wildly successful H&8th Night Market, 7 p.m. Friday. Admission to the event is free.

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