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OKC animation studio wins Telly Awards

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Brian Eyerman takes a heartfelt approach to architectural renderings, including digital video. The style seems to work for Skyline Ink Animation Studios, his Oklahoma City-based firm, because it recently won two Telly Awards, one of the highest honors in the film and video production industry.

“Animation typically attempts to give people a virtual tour of a building,” Eyerman said. “It is treated as a technical endeavor, and I prefer to treat them as an emotional or storytelling endeavor.”

The goal is to create a video that is relevant even after clients have “the real thing,” he said. A promotional video for Midtown that Skyline produced in 2006 is still fascinating because it uses a car tour of Automobile Alley and Midtown to relate a story about area development and can be viewed at skylineink.com.

“I used a video game steering wheel to produce that video,” Eyerman said. “Computer animation is going to be perfect in terms of how things are rendered. But the world is not perfect, so we had to program in imperfection, and a human on the steering wheel made that possible.”

Those touches helped make Skyline one of the most sought-after firms in the country. In addition to expo centers for Anaheim and Los Angeles, Eyerman also oversaw animation for a new stadium for the NFL’s Jacksonville Jaguars in Florida, a rendering that landed the project on The Colbert Report.

“I got a call from a friend, and he said, ‘You’re on Colbert,’” Eyerman said. “Actually, Colbert was making fun of the swimming pools on top of an NFL stadium. I was just doing what the customer asked.”

Eyerman is an OKC native and graduate of Carl Albert High School and the University of Oklahoma (OU). He entered college as an art major but switched to architecture.

He took animation classes at OU and through a program at City Arts Center.

“Pixar released Toy Story in 1995, and I was taking animation classes in 1994,” Eyerman said. “There wasn’t much animation in Oklahoma in those days.”

After a one-year internship at a local firm, he developed his own business. Clients were slow to call, so in 2000, Eyerman hauled his equipment to the Oklahoma State Fair and stayed all day, every day.

“I just calculated that among those tens of thousands of people would be architects,” Eyerman said.

He picked up more customers there than from any professional trade show he has attended. After that, his company grew, and in 2007, Skyline Ink moved to the Flatiron District at 17 Harrison Ave.

Print Headline: Soulful renderings, An OKC animation studio is one of the most sought-after firms in the country, and it has the Telly Awards to prove it.

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