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Oklahoma lawmakers join Obama 'birther' movement

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The "birther" movement, a ploy to raise questions about whether President Barack Obama was born in the United States, thereby meeting the qualifications to be president, has been getting a lot of attention lately.   

During the last legislative session, state Rep. Mike Ritze, R-Broken Arrow, floated a measure requiring proof of citizenship for candidates. Ritze told The Oke that he doesn't think the prez submitted a real copy of his birth certificate.

"This could have taken care of the whole thing if we had a state law that any candidate has to show it up front,"  Ritze told The Oke. His state measure failed last April.

Meanwhile, U.S. Rep. Bill Posey, R-Florida, introduced a bill that would require future presidential candidates to submit a copy of their birth certificate. 

As reported in a March blog post on Politico.com, Posey said in a statement that he proposed the legislation to "remove this issue as a reason for questioning the legitimacy of a candidate elected as President." That hasn't stopped some prominent political pundits from getting involved in the conspiracy theorizing. 

Conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh joked on the June 10 episode of his show, "What do Obama and God have in common? Neither has a birth certificate. How do they differ? God does not think he's Obama."

A little more than a month later, The Huffington Post reported that CNN reporter Rick Sanchez read Obama's birth certificate on television, attempting to silence the ongoing clamoring of the "birthers."

Despite this, Oklahoma's own state Sen. Randy Brogdon, R-Owasso, has chimed in on the movement. Brogdon, who has announced his plan to run for governor in 2010, told The Washington Independent a few days before Sanchez gave the certificate the oral treatment that he would support a bill similar to Posey's national proposal here at the state level.

He added that he would sign the hypothetical bill if he was elected governor. "You bet I'd sign it," Brogdon told David Weigel from The Independent. "I know I'd have no problem showing my birth certificate."

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