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The devil went down to Photoshop

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If you've been watching "Lost" and trying to figure out if Jacob really is the devil, the March issue of Nuestra Comunidad offers another clue suggesting the true identity of Beelzebub.

The local Hispanic newspaper did a Photoshop job to make el diablo appear to be none other than state Rep. Randy Terrill, R-Moore, with the requisite horns, tail and pitchfork.

Terrill was the author of House Bill 1804, aka the Oklahoma Taxpayer and Citizen Protection Act of 2007, a law that targets the state's illegal immigrants.

Now Terrill's new measure, House Bill 3384, would require the state's public schools to check the immigration status of students and report the information to the Oklahoma Department of Education. The lawmaker told the Tulsa World he wants to collect good data about the price of teaching the offspring of illegal immigrants.

"Certainly, some schools are gathering this information already," Terrill told the World, adding that he believes the costs are "stunningly high."

The Nuestra Comunidad's headline reads "Malvado Randy Terrill y Legisladores Racistas Atacan Nuevamente" with the subhead "Esta vez víctimas son niños inmigrantes." Franco Cevallos, founder and editor of the Nuestra Comunidad publication distributed in the OKC metro, translated both headlines for Chicken-Fried News: "Mean Randy Terrill and racist legislators attack again" and "This time the victims are migrant children."

"He's worse than the devil to us," Cevallos told CFN. "Now he wants to kick the little kids out of the school. In his efforts to oust the Hispanics from Oklahoma, he's going to destroy children."

These youngsters will resort to joining street gangs, Cevallos said. "These kids have no place to go," he said. "The only affected ones are going to be the children.

"Oklahoma City will experience more crime, ignorance, unemployment."

Cevallos also claimed HB 3384 is unconstitutional.

The Supreme Court ruled in 1982 that the 14th Amendment's Equal Protection Clause prevented public schools in Texas from barring illegal immigrants, saying such a ban could lead to "the creation and perpetuation of a subclass of illiterates," according to the World.

The World story suggested that high costs could help challenge that decision, which was based on the finding that Texas didn't show that a "substantial interest" would be served by keeping the children of illegal immigrants out of the public school system.

Click to view the cover of Nuestra Comunidad.

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