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University of Oklahoma professor sheds light on mating habits

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For years, the CFN crew has wondered what methods Bucky the intern employs when pursuing potential mates. Some of the companions Bucky has brought to company parties have made us call local mental health wards checking to see if any residents have gone missing.

But a recent study from a University of Oklahoma professor sheds light on Bucky's mating habits. Apparently, our eternal intern has a lot in common with the male Atlantic molly.

Biology researcher Martin Plath found that the molly, a colorful, guppy-type fish, likes to deceive other male mollies when zeroing in on a date, according to a study published online in Current Biology. By showing little interest in the choice female he really wants to swim with, it causes the other male rivals to have a lack of interest as well.

"I find it particularly interesting that fish are capable of such a sophisticated behavior," Plath was quoted in Biotech Law Weekly.

If Plath knew Bucky, sophisticated would probably not be the choice of word.

Plath pointed out that while many animals use deception for various things like hiding food or protecting offspring, this is the first study to show males tricking other males about their girl. Plath apparently did not go to a high school where boys teased each other about the hot girl they fix each other up with, only to find out the girl was your sister.

"The study highlights that traits that we typically ascribe to humans only can also be found in other, seemingly simpler animals and that no consciousness or self-awareness is needed for a behavior like deception to occur," Plath said.

In other words, deceiving someone does not take a high level of thought. It's as easy to trick a fish as it is to trick a person. Now there's a bumper sticker.

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